Drawing The Line: Artist Red Siri0

Chelsea Delaney
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15 min read
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May 18, 2024

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Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. Text reads: Red Siri0, Drawing The Line Written by: Chelsea Delaney. The artwork is is black white and heavy blood red.
Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. It is skeleton twins in black and white. Their cheeks look chubby. Text reads: There is a Universe Inside Each of Us We long to unfurl, taking up the space that the universe requires, all the while fearing what happens if we fully arrive in the space we've created. When we meet Red Siri0, we see that it can be as beautiful as we'd hoped. Multiply neurodivergent, transgender, disabled, and part of the Goth and BDSM communities, he does not shy away from any part of his universe. On the contrary, he translates this soulful complexity into his art, art that "shake[s] people emotionally, to stir a reaction within them." Even his name speaks of his dedication to expressing essence—Red for passion and for his old nickname Redrum from Kubrick's masterpiece, The Shining. And as for that intriguing zero at the end of Siri0, he says: "The zero symbolizes everything that begins and ends, the cycle of life and death, but also of rebirth and creation. In the particular case of my works, the zero symbolizes the fact that everything can be created from nothing, just as everything can remain as it is if there is no internal intervention, a spark of creativity. The Zero is the moment in which an artwork appears from nothing. The zero is everything, yet it is nothing." This whole poetic, passionate universe starts with the line. Red's IG bio tells us he's obsessed with lines, something that's easy to see as you start looking through his work. For something so "simple" and overlooked, he sees into the heart of them. "Lines bring me a sense of freedom and expression that I cannot find anywhere else. To me, they represent the limitless possibilities of creation and the infinite pathways that life can take." He also works primarily in black and white, about which he says: "In black and white art, every line and curve is intensified, every tone and texture accentuated. In removing color, artists must focus on the fundamentals of shape, shading, and highlighting, which require high technical skill and a broad understanding of design principles." This combination of line and color creates a versatile and dynamic foundation for a diverse body of work, one that is further enhanced by mixing digital and traditional media. Picking "favorites" in his body of work is like trying to pick a favorite star in the sky. There are some portraits, faces full of wisdom and longing, but much more of his figurative work is human-like.
Wire artwork by Sirio, it is of two female energy people.
Black and white photo of a bulldog. Text reads: He tells us that these pieces come from his imagination and that he lets their features emerge as their personality reveals itself to him. A little past humanoids are his "monstrous creatures." He says he often starts these with a basic shape and then modifies them until he reaches the vision in his head. These monsters run the gamut from terrifying to adorable with "some pretty dark intentions." Wherever you are in his vast collection, you are left mesmerized and deeply affected. With such a prolific creator, you might imagine that he's always created this boldly and widely, but he tells us of a time when even he "lost touch with who [he] was as a person." Red stopped drawing altogether until a psychotherapist suggested he pick it back up again as part of his therapy. He also says, "My art took on a renewed vigor when I came out as a transgender person. It became a conduit for my journey of self-discovery and self-expression." This is perhaps why his erotic art holds special significance for him. About it, he says: "This section of my body of work is very personal and reflects my own experiences, particularly in the BDSM community where I am a dominant. I aim to shed light on unconventional sexualities and bring attention to important issues such as consent. Many people view BDSM as destructive and cruel, but in reality, we are only individuals who enjoy playing and exploring within clear boundaries and with respect for one another. Another constant in my erotic art is non-normative bodies, as I want to give visibility to those with physical appearances that differ from what society deems as 'normal.' I myself do not have a 'normal' body." Though it may be highlighted by these non-normative bodies, much of Siri0's work asks us to consider how relative "reality" is, especially a reality that is largely dictated by the neurotypical majority. He prefers not to worry too much about whether or not others consider him an activist for initiating these types of conversations but instead to be in integrity with himself. "I try to show that there are other realities out there because society needs to understand [them]. From the trans community to the disabled community, we are not well known and are especially stereotyped from genius to stupid without any middle ground. I have made several videos that clearly show my tics, my constant movement, and my stimming, and I believe that we should be more open in showing ourselves rather than allowing ourselves to be represented by the media who consistently trivialize and stereotype us."
Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. It is of a female energy attractive, but slightly decomposed. Their eyes are red and have tattoos. Their hair is long and straight. Header text reads: Emotions as artistic fuel. Body text reads: The zero is my life and, therefore, my death, being part of it. It is a cycle in which everything is created and everything is destroyed. Also, as a neurodivergent artist, I believe that more light should be shed on the autistic spectrum and co-morbidities that may be associated because each being is different, and we autistic individuals differ from each other while often being seen in the same stereotypical way. And if it is true, as it is true, that I express myself, live, and think differently and divergently, who said that it is worse than the diversity that I see in a neurotypical person? The truth is that what is defined as "normality," or "typically," or "neurotypical" means nothing more than "majority": if autistic individuals were the majority, the neurotypical ones would be the "different" people. This tells us how relative reality is.
Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. It is of two people facing in opposite directions. Where there ears meet is in the shape of an art. The photo is in black and white and blood red.
Text only: Besides proper representation of marginalized peoples, Red is also thinking deeply about a variety of other issues that concern his communities. He is worried that A.I. art will "allow art to be reduced to a button pressed by anyone." Though he believes A.I. has benefits, he thinks a much deeper conversation is needed about art's true meaning and how it represents us as humans. He's also worried about a "flattening of freedom of thought" when it comes to language in the neurodivergent and disabled communities. He wants people like himself, who find functioning labels useful, to be able to use them without fear of being called ableist. Finally, he is also afraid of how the Church blocks progress and recognition of identity for LGBTQIAPK people. He says, "Denying diversity is dishonest, dangerous, and does not solve any problems." You sense a deep kindness in all of these concerns, one you might not immediately expect from someone who creates such raw and dramatic works. In Red Siri0, you have an older brother who is looking out for you as you become your own cosmos. Interview Chelsea Delaney (CD) - Hello, Red Sirio, thank you so much for your time today. It's taken me forever to compile this interview because whenever I go to your Instagram, all I end up doing is staring at your visceral, mesmeric work. I can't wait to hear about your journey and insights.  CD: Can you tell us a little bit about the name Red Siri0? I'm especially intrigued by how the zero at the end surprises our expectations of "what's in a name." Thank you for your interest in my name; I'm glad it caught your attention. The origins of my name date back to my old nickname, "Redrum," from the famous horror film "The Shining" by Stanley Kubrick, which I deeply love. The story of a young boy alone with an imaginary friend reminds me of myself as a child. Additionally, I have a deep passion for the color red, which represents passion, and anything passionate, perfectly reflecting my personality, passionate about their special interests. The zero symbolizes everything that begins and ends, the cycle of life and death, but also of rebirth and creation. In the particular case of my works, the zero symbolizes the fact that everything can be created from nothing, just as everything can remain as it is if there is no internal intervention, a spark of creativity. The Zero is the moment in which an artwork appears from nothing. The zero is everything, yet it is nothing. The zero represents my transgender identity, and therefore being restarted from zero and "reborn" in some way. It also symbolizes my awareness of being on the autism spectrum: for me, the diagnosis of autism was the first awareness of my identity as an autistic person and the beginning of an understanding of myself that I did not have before. The zero can be associated with the Chaos from which everything is created and destroyed, and in this Chaos, I am born and die every day, every time I create, every time I talk about my neurodiversities, every time I enter or exit a burnout. Quote: "... I believe that we should be more open in showing ourselves rather than allowing ourselves to be represented by the media who consistently trivialize and stereotype us."
Wire art of a female presence. Her lips are human like. She is beautiful.
Picture is a black and white portrait of Red Siri0. Text reads: CD:  Where do you get your inspiration from? My muse, if you will, is found within the complexities of my own existence. The very essence of who I am, the ebbs and flows of my emotions, and the sheer depth of my feelings. I do not rely on a predetermined source of inspiration but rather allow the energy of life and death to guide me. I believe that art is a language all its own, a language that speaks to the soul, one that transcends the limitations of linguistic expression. My art is not just a product of my creativity, but it is also a means of communication, an attempt to bridge the gap between my inner world and the outer world. I seek to shake people emotionally, to stir a reaction within them, for I believe that the purpose of art is to evoke something, whether that be beauty, sadness, or anger.
Picture bottom left is a portrait of Red Siri0. The three remaining pictures are art pieces by Red Siri0.
Picture is of a wire art piece by Red Siri0. It is of a male energy in a squatting position. Text reads: Art has been the tool with which I have expressed myself when I could not find the words to do so. Even though I was born into an artistic environment, I went through a phase where I stopped drawing altogether. It was a time when my life was in turmoil, and I had lost touch with who I was as a person. It was only when a wise psychotherapist recommended that I start drawing as a means of therapy that I began to rediscover myself and my passion for art. My art took on a renewed vigor when I came out as a transgender person. It became a conduit for my journey of self-discovery and self-expression. I am forever grateful to that psychotherapist for opening up a whole new world to me, a world where I could connect with others through the language of art.  CD: You say you're obsessed with lines in your Instagram bio, which is easy to feel as I look through your work. Where did this obsession start, what does it bring you, and what is your current relationship with the line?  My obsession with lines, oh, where to begin! I have always had a passion for intricate details and complex patterns because that is where I see myself the most. I am a complex person, and this is reflected in my works, whether it is the tangled and seemingly random scribbles of scribble art or the more structured yet elaborate parallel lines of line art. Lines form the shapes of creations, just as a living being is made up of many different parts. Studying lines in every possible form brings me such joy and satisfaction as if I am unlocking the secrets of the universe with every stroke of my pen. Lately, I have been experimenting with mixing wire with canvas and ropes, which is an ambitious project but one that I hope to bring to life, quite literally. Lines bring me a sense of freedom and expression that I cannot find anywhere else. To me, they represent the limitless possibilities of creation and the infinite pathways that life can take. So you see, my relationship with lines is one of passion, one that drives me to push boundaries and explore new horizons.
Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. It is of a dark blood red ball of flames energy. It could belong to the head of a character. Text reads: RED.
Text only reads: CD: I imagine that the term "goth" is not well understood by people outside that community. What does goth mean to you? Is it why a lot of your work is black and white?  Goth is not just a fashion statement or style; it is a subculture that incorporates art, music, literature, and personal expression as a way of life. It is an identity that is deeply rooted in individuality, rebellion, and, often, the darker aspects of life. At its core, Goth represents a rejection of mainstream culture and values and creates a space for individuals to explore and embrace their own unique identities and perspectives. This subculture is about so much more than just wearing black clothing and eyeliner. Goth culture is deeply connected to music, particularly gothic rock, industrial, and post-punk. Goth fashion, makeup, and other elements of the style are often inspired by the music and subculture surrounding it. Additionally, Goth culture has a rich history in art, literature, and philosophy. It is a subculture steeped in dark romanticism, horror, and Gothic fiction. It is a place where creativity and expression know no bounds. So, if you think that Goth is just a style or fashion statement, you are missing out on the depth and richness that this subculture can offer. It is part of an identity, a way of life, and a community that embraces individuality and celebrates diversity. Goth is so much more than just a look, and it deserves to be recognized and respected as a subculture.  CD: How do you get such rich, full experiences in black and white? I've always been fascinated by the elegance and drama that artists can bring with just black and white (mostly because I can't figure out how to do it in my paintings).  First of all, of course, I've always worn and still wear total black, so it's more natural for me to draw like this. I have tried and sometimes use color, but I truly believe that black and white is a great and enduring combination of colors that has been used in art for centuries. What I find so fascinating about black and white is its ability to evoke a wide range of emotions and moods, from harsh and surprising to gentle and calm. Achieving a full and fulfilling experience in black-and-white art requires a skillful balance between light and dark, contrast, and composition. In black and white art, every line and curve is intensified, every tone and texture accentuated. In removing color, artists must focus on the fundamentals of shape, shading, and highlighting, which require high technical skill and a broad understanding of design principles. For this reason, black-and-white art undoubtedly requires precision and discipline; it is the result of the artist's devotion, skill, and ingenuity. However, beyond the technicalities, black and white also provides artists with an immense amount of artistic expression. Byeliminating color, I can deepen the raw emotional impact of my subjects. Black and white can capture the very essence of the world with startling clarity. CD: You use both digital and traditional media in a lot of your pieces. Did you learn digital or traditional media first? I don't see traditional and digital art as two separate entities but rather as complementary forms of expression that can be incorporated into the same artwork. For instance, I often sketch out my ideas on paper using traditional methods, and then I. Article continued on next page.
Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. It is of a person with soft features. There is a tree growing out of their neck. There is a raven perced on a piece of the skin. This is a humanoid. Text reads: take a photo to finish the piece using digital drawing software. I love to use my fingers, whatever media. By combining traditional and digital media, I can create artwork that has a unique and textured quality to it. My approach to art is grounded in an appreciation for the creative process, and whether I'm using traditional or digital means, my aim is always to bring my artistic vision to life. For me, the joy of creating art is in the act of creating, and regardless of the medium, as long as I am expressing myself and channeling my creative energy, I am fulfilled. CD: Are there any subjects that are best served by all digital or all traditional media? In my work, traditional and digital media are both integral parts of the art world and in my personal work, I find that I need both to truly bring my inspirations to life. However, my latest idea project has really pushed me to embrace many forms of media. I was also a sculptor using wire, so recently I've found myself going back to incorporating sculpture into my canvas. I hope that the combination of these forms of expression will allow me to create something as unique and beautiful as this new project is in my imagination. I believe that when it comes to art, limiting myself to just one medium can really hinder my creativity. I need to push myself to explore new techniques and materials to truly bring my visions to life. CD: Do the characters you create (monsters or more humanoid) have an initial human face, or do their physical traits come from your imagination? Sometimes I create portraits of real people, but most of the time, the physical characteristics of the characters I create come from my imagination. I don't have a preconceived image in my mind of what their faces should look like. I prefer to let their features emerge as I draw them, building a personality that is reflected in their appearance. When it comes to monstrous creatures, the realm of imagination is even more free, and I often start with a basic shape and modify its features until I get the final result that I envision in my mind. Regardless, I always try to bring out the character's personality through their physical appearance.
Photo of Red Sirio. He is wearing a tshirt, resting his head on the back of his fingers to the side. Text reads: Holistic therapist In addition to his artistic prowess, Sirio Morini (aka Red Siri0) is also a licensed therapist and yoga instructor. He employs a variety of therapies: Gestalt, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Person-Centered Therapy, to name a few. He has received training from an autist provider that helps him further specialize in neurodivergent affirming care. His yoga practice focuses on recovery yoga, especially from certain conditions like fibromyalgia. In all modalities, Sirio offers a safe space for people to recognize their potential to heal. Please visit his profile at the International Association of Therapists to learn more and access his appointment calendar: https://iaoth.com/author/sirio-morini/
Wire art by Siro of a human like creature with butterfly wings.
Picture is of an art piece by Red Siri0. It is a black and white piece of a male and female energy embracing each other. Text reads: CD: I love your collection of little monsters--they make my heart happy. Can you tell us a little bit about these delightful creatures?  Thanks so much for the compliment! I absolutely adore creating these little monsters. There are so many different parts of my being, but the part that is most present when I'm drawing these creatures is definitely the childlike part of me. I love making these cute and sweet monsters with a twist-- they may look adorable, but they have some pretty terrible intentions! I always find myself smiling while drawing them because it's so much fun to create them. CD: Your erotic work is also quite gorgeous and powerful (even with the absurd censorship that social media makes necessary). I've read through your photo comments on these pieces, but what would you like to share with our readers about this section of your body of work? This section of my body of work is very personal and reflects my own experiences, particularly in the BDSM community where I am a dominant. I aim to shed light on unconventional sexualities and bring attention to important issues such as consent. Many people view BDSM as destructive and cruel, but in reality, we are only individuals who enjoy playing and exploring within clear boundaries and with respect for one another. Another constant in my erotic art is non-normative bodies, as I want to give visibility to those with physical appearances that differ from what society deems as "normal." I myself do not have a "normal" body. It is tragicomic that so many people speak of empathy, yet when faced with differences or divergences, they immediately discriminate. CD: Some people would consider you an activist just by being trans/autist/disabled and open about it on your Instagram. Would you consider yourself an activist, or is it more about you sharing your life, just like anybody with non-marginalized identities gets to do online? I've never really understood what people mean by activism, but I certainly value the visibility and representation of people with difficulties like mine. In general, I believe that telling your own story with your face and giving accurate information is activism. If activism is only considered to be done on the streets in demonstrations or within a fixed offline community, then no, I'm not an activist.
Wire art of two lovers in an embrace. It is beautiful All wire art is in black/purple.
Picture is a portrait of Red Siri0 in front of their lovers wire art. Text reads: Activism - con't I know that some people consider me an activist, and some don't, but it's not my problem. I try to show that there are other realities out there because society needs to understand them. From the trans community to the disabled community, we are not well known and are especially stereotyped from genius to stupid without any middle ground. I have made several videos that clearly show my tics, my constant movement, and my stimming, and I believe that we should be more open in showing ourselves rather than allowing ourselves to be represented by the media who consistently trivialize and stereotype us. I also find it depressing the phenomenon of single-minded thinking around autism and A.D.H.D. in particular, and I'm starting to see too many neurotypical people pretending to be neurodivergent to sell "cures" for autism. There is no cure for autism. We are not something that needs to be fixed but something that needs to be respected. Q: What do these identities (trans/autist/disabled) bring to your artwork? As an artist with a neurodivergent brain, I find the idea that people don't have to identify with their disabilities or difficulties to be ridiculous and privileged. My brain is a fundamental part of who I am and what I create. To suggest otherwise is to ignore the truth of my experience and the immense value my neurodivergent identity brings to my art. Whether it's my experiences as a transgender person or my struggles with anxiety and burnout, every aspect of my identity has informed and influenced my work. My art is not only a reflection of me but also a means to explore and express the unique perspectives and insights that come with being neurodivergent. So, I'm not just an aspect of what I do, I'm the heart and soul of it. Without my identities, my work would be empty and meaningless. So I hate when people tell me I shouldn't identify with my brain - it's my brain! I'm proud of who I am and all I've gone through to create the art I make. And I will continue to draw on the richness of my neurodivergent identity to fuel my creativity and push the boundaries of what art can be for me.
Artwork of a bald man and it looks like his head is covered in blood.
Photo of digital artwork of an omnious humanoid man looking at the camera. Text reads: CD: Is there anything else that you would like to share with our readers before we end today? Maybe some of my concerns.  As an artist, I am concerned about the proliferation of so-called 'AI Art' applications that peddle fake art since they are created by machines! Art is the expression of an emotion, an interpretation of the world, and cannot be created by an algorithm. I know that many people are enthusiastic about these technologies, but we must keep in mind what art means to us and how it represents us as humans.Maybe some of my concerns.  As an artist, I am concerned about the proliferation of so-called 'AI Art' applications that peddle fake art since they are created by machines! Art is the expression of an emotion, an interpretation of the world, and cannot be created by an algorithm. I know that many people are enthusiastic about these technologies, but we must keep in mind what art means to us and how it represents us as humans.We cannot allow art to be reduced to a button pressed by anyone. I invite everyone to study art and understand its true meaning because only then can we appreciate it as it deserves and preserve this fundamental aspect of our culture.  I love artificial intelligence and the human-machine connection, but when it comes to art, we need to have a deeper conversation, and it should be the prerogative only of real artists because saying 'art created by A.I.' is nonsense and offending all of us living, human artists.   As a neurodivergent and disabled person, I am concerned about a certain drift from wanting to convey information to a flattening of freedom of thought. I no longer have the right to say that I am a second-level autistic. Otherwise, they tell me that I am ableist. I do not understand why: levels are extremely important because they do not quantify disability, but the needs that person has based on their condition. The fact that dozens and dozens of improvised characters and miraculous cures are being created does not give me hope.  As an LGBTQIAPK person, I am concerned about the interference of the Church in temporal power, which blocks progress and recognition of our identities. In general, I cannot stand injustices and inequality. I would like to remind everyone who talks about equality within society that it is not a step forward, but equity, that is. Denying diversity is dishonest, dangerous, and does not solve any problems. We must instead aim for equity. The diversity is a gift, we are all different. Quote by Sirio - And let me say to all neurodivergent artists: the world needs to see our art! - Red Siri0

Follow the artistry of Red Siri0 on his Instagram and Facebook. For more insights into Sirio Morini's holistic therapy practice, explore: Mindful Talking.

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